Midwest Genealogy Center Building

The Midwest Genealogy Center opened in June 2008. The largest free-standing public genealogy library in the United States boasts 52,000 square feet of resources for family history researchers.

LOCK DOWN: Outlaws, Lawmen and Frontier Justice in Jackson County, Missouri

Take a virtual trip back in time with David Jackson behind the iron bars of Jackson County’s historic 1859 jail and Marshal’s home.

Forgotten Warriors: The Role of the American Indian in Civil War Trans-Mississippi

Historian Arnold Schofield chronicles the role of Indian tribes played on both sides of the Civil War in the Midwest.

Blue Springs Connections to its Early History

Re-enactor Barbara Hughes portrays Rhoda Harris, who settled with her husband, William, in the Blue Springs area in 1832.

Genealogy Blogs

In the Beginning... (or Let's Begin Again)

Are you just starting on your genealogy quest? Maybe, you’ve been at it for years and have just hit a roadblock. Perhaps, you used to do genealogy and are trying to get back into the swing of things. If you fit into any of these categories, then you might consider attending a Beginning Genealogy class at the Midwest Genealogy Center. Most of our staff members teach the beginning course, and everyone teaches it a little bit differently. But no matter which class you attend, you will learn (or perhaps re-learn) the basic principles of genealogy.

MGC's Irish Expert Retires

Maria, our wonderful Irish expert, has retired.  But never fear - she will be coming back to do Irish appointments after a needed time away.  Look for her Irish Expert appointments to continue later this year.  Maria joined the genealogy staff of Mid-Continent Public Library in November 2004.  A native of Dublin, Ireland, she quickly began using her knowledge of Ireland and its records to help researchers find their Irish ancestors.  The one-on-one appointments have always been the favorite part of her job and often led to tears of both the patron and Maria, as

From Angels to Hellcats: A Book Review

History is full of the stories of men, their wars, and conquests, but less often does one hear of the women who have helped to mold history. From Angels to Hellcats, tells the stories of some of Texas’  legendary women, both famous and infamous. The first woman’s life to be examined is Susanna Dickinson, who, along with her fifteen-month old daughter, survived the Alamo.

The Bus Stops Here!

The Metro has added a bus stop at the Midwest Genealogy Center!  The new Metro #286-Silver Route provides Tuesday and Thursday service from five other points in Independence, including the Independence MetroCenter, Olde Oak Tree Apartments, Noland Road & 39th, Social Security Administration, and Centerpoint Medical Center. Transfer options are available at the Independence MetroCenter, at the #284-Purple Route at 35th & Noland Rd. (Old Oak Tree Apartments), and at the #183-Green Route at Centerpoint.

Narcissa Whitman, Pioneer Missionary

Barbara Hughes began her presentation by personifying Narcissa Whitman. “Narcissa” commenced by explaining how she was called into missionary work in 1835, and then met and married Dr. Marcus Whitman. The Whitmans, along with Henry and Eliza Spalding, traveled to Fort Walla Walla in what is now known as Washington State. Through the slide presentation, as well as the information and descriptions given by Mrs. Hughes and “Narcissa,” the audience followed Narcissa from her missionary calling to the tragic Whitman Massacre.

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