Midwest Genealogy Center Building

The Midwest Genealogy Center opened in June 2008. The largest free-standing public genealogy library in the United States boasts 52,000 square feet of resources for family history researchers.

Finding Your Slave Ancestors

In celebration of Black History Month, the Midwest Genealogy Center and the Midwest Afro-American Genealogical Interest Coalition (M.A.G.I.C.) are presenting a workshop on how African Americans can locate their enslaved ancestors.

MGC’s Spring Seminar 2017: The Legal Genealogist

Join Midwest Genealogy Center for this year’s Spring Seminar, a day-long event featuring Judy Russell "The Legal Genealogist" at Adam’s Pointe Conference Center Registration fee is $60 and includes a buffet lunch.

Voices from Ellis Island

In this one-person show, Pippa White tells the exciting stories of seven immigrants who made their way through Ellis Island in the early part of the 20th Century.

Genealogy Blogs

Find Yourself after Adoption

One of the most difficult challenges in genealogy research is coming up against an adoption brick wall. The Midwest Genealogy Center receives many questions about adoption issues and has different types of resources that can help—from books to periodicals to online resources. Along with these resources, a two-part program, Adoptees: Search for Your Biological Parents, featuring Dorene Johnson, will be presented at MGC on February 21 and 28.

FANning Yourself Genealogy Gold

Did you know that each of your ancestors had a FAN club? Yes, you read that correctly, and these FANs (friends, associates, and neighbors) can provide genealogy gold. Also known as cluster genealogy, this technique helps you find the people who interacted with your ancestor. Let’s say you’re trying to find an ancestor, but they seem to have disappeared. Sometimes knowing their FAN club can help you find the perfect clue. 

That’s for Old People!

"That’s for old people!" is a commonly heard phrase when young people hear the word genealogy. The misconception that genealogy is boring or only for old people ends as soon as a youth finds that first document containing a family member. Then genealogy becomes something fun for them.

The Gift of Knowledge

An Arapaho phrase says, “If we wonder often, the gift of knowledge will come.” Researching your Native American ancestors can be a challenge because there are 566 federally recognized tribes, but understanding the records and how to search them will help you find your family. 

Do You Hear What I Hear?

I hear oral histories! What is an oral history? Simply the recording of a part of a person’s life. A single story about something that happened—the story of how Grandma and Grandpa met. Or the story of Dad serving in the Gulf Wars. Or what life was like growing up in the 1950s. Or the story of working as a cab driver for 30 years. You get the idea! Any part of a person’s life that was important and should be saved for future generations to hear.

Screen reader users: Please switch to forms mode for this link.
Feedback
Click to
leave a
comment