Midwest Genealogy Center Building

The Midwest Genealogy Center opened in June 2008. The largest free-standing public genealogy library in the United States boasts 52,000 square feet of resources for family history researchers.

Brick Wall Discussion Group

Get together with others to share helpful information, network, and gather inspiration to help you continue your genealogy project.

Kansas City, Our Collective Memories

What we collect as individuals becomes a part of our collective legacy as a community. Join author Bruce Mathews as he shares what Kansas City citizens hold dear and what it says about them and our community.

Kansas City Women of Independent Minds

Meet the women who made Kansas City and Jackson County history. Follow local historian David W. Jackson on a journey through time from the early 1800s to present and discover Kansas City’s "herstory".

Genealogy Blogs

Organizing your Genealogy

Finding your family's history—names of ancestors, key dates, occupations, locations, and so forth—is the fun part of genealogy. For many, however, organizing this search tends to fall by the wayside; and yet, organizing your research can save you countless headaches down the road. For example, you don't want to research the same ancestor twice, search for a marriage license you have already added to your collection, or spend time looking through books you have previously reviewed. If starting to organize your research seems intimidating, the Midwest Genealogy Center is here to help.

Attend a Genealogy Conference from Home

Have you ever wanted to attend a national genealogical conference? National conferences are wonderful learning opportunities—from discovering new research techniques to networking with genealogists from around the world. Not everyone has the chance or leisure to attend these conferences, but what can you do?

Genealogy in Dictionaries? Yes!

Dictionaries may not be the first place you’d look for your ancestors, but give it a try! Like standard dictionaries, biographical dictionary entries are listed in alphabetical order, but instead of word definitions, you’ll find short biographies. 

Wills-what’s next?

You’ve found your ancestor's will. Yay! But now what? Where do you go from here? Your next step is researching probate case records. Almost all wills were presented in probate courts to be proved through a hearing process. Then the will was recorded and registered. The entire process can generate a gold mine of information for genealogists. 

Using Funeral Home Records for Genealogy

Genealogy is the pursuit of information on individuals and families. Many times, records generated by someone’s death can bring a wealth of information on that person’s life. Death records, obituaries, and burial notices can provide clues to what that person was like but also can provide information on their family members. Often, family history researchers will overlook one important piece in the burial process: the funeral home. That’s right; funeral home records are another great resource to find out information on your ancestors.

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