Midwest Genealogy Center Building

The Midwest Genealogy Center opened in June 2008. The largest free-standing public genealogy library in the United States boasts 52,000 square feet of resources for family history researchers.

LOCK DOWN: Outlaws, Lawmen and Frontier Justice in Jackson County, Missouri

Take a virtual trip back in time with David Jackson behind the iron bars of Jackson County’s historic 1859 jail and Marshal’s home.

Forgotten Warriors: The Role of the American Indian in Civil War Trans-Mississippi

Historian Arnold Schofield chronicles the role of Indian tribes played on both sides of the Civil War in the Midwest.

Blue Springs Connections to its Early History

Re-enactor Barbara Hughes portrays Rhoda Harris, who settled with her husband, William, in the Blue Springs area in 1832.

Genealogy Blogs

Wills-what’s next?

You’ve found your ancestor's will. Yay! But now what? Where do you go from here? Your next step is researching probate case records. Almost all wills were presented in probate courts to be proved through a hearing process. Then the will was recorded and registered. The entire process can generate a gold mine of information for genealogists. 

Using Funeral Home Records for Genealogy

Genealogy is the pursuit of information on individuals and families. Many times, records generated by someone’s death can bring a wealth of information on that person’s life. Death records, obituaries, and burial notices can provide clues to what that person was like but also can provide information on their family members. Often, family history researchers will overlook one important piece in the burial process: the funeral home. That’s right; funeral home records are another great resource to find out information on your ancestors.

My Pot of Gold

When I first became interested in genealogy more than 25 years ago, I began by asking my mother for stories about our family in Australia. She told me all kinds of stories, but there was one in particular I remembered. The story went that our family had once owned a castle in Ireland and then lost it through unknown circumstances. My mom did not really believe the story, but it was something she had heard about growing up. I was curious about where the story originated and if any part of it was true. 

Path to Citizenship

Immigration and naturalization research can be a rewarding part of a genealogist's family history journey. Most of us have ancestors who immigrated to the United States from other countries. By following each person’s path to citizenship, we learn more about our ancestors. 

Find Yourself after Adoption

One of the most difficult challenges in genealogy research is coming up against an adoption brick wall. The Midwest Genealogy Center receives many questions about adoption issues and has different types of resources that can help—from books to periodicals to online resources. Along with these resources, a two-part program, Adoptees: Search for Your Biological Parents, featuring Dorene Johnson, will be presented at MGC on February 21 and 28.

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