Midwest Genealogy Center Building

The Midwest Genealogy Center opened in June 2008. The largest free-standing public genealogy library in the United States boasts 52,000 square feet of resources for family history researchers.

LOCK DOWN: Outlaws, Lawmen and Frontier Justice in Jackson County, Missouri

Take a virtual trip back in time with David Jackson behind the iron bars of Jackson County’s historic 1859 jail and Marshal’s home.

Forgotten Warriors: The Role of the American Indian in Civil War Trans-Mississippi

Historian Arnold Schofield chronicles the role of Indian tribes played on both sides of the Civil War in the Midwest.

Blue Springs Connections to its Early History

Re-enactor Barbara Hughes portrays Rhoda Harris, who settled with her husband, William, in the Blue Springs area in 1832.

Genealogy Blogs

FANning Yourself Genealogy Gold

Did you know that each of your ancestors had a FAN club? Yes, you read that correctly, and these FANs (friends, associates, and neighbors) can provide genealogy gold. Also known as cluster genealogy, this technique helps you find the people who interacted with your ancestor. Let’s say you’re trying to find an ancestor, but they seem to have disappeared. Sometimes knowing their FAN club can help you find the perfect clue. 

That’s for Old People!

"That’s for old people!" is a commonly heard phrase when young people hear the word genealogy. The misconception that genealogy is boring or only for old people ends as soon as a youth finds that first document containing a family member. Then genealogy becomes something fun for them.

The Gift of Knowledge

An Arapaho phrase says, “If we wonder often, the gift of knowledge will come.” Researching your Native American ancestors can be a challenge because there are 566 federally recognized tribes, but understanding the records and how to search them will help you find your family. 

Do You Hear What I Hear?

I hear oral histories! What is an oral history? Simply the recording of a part of a person’s life. A single story about something that happened—the story of how Grandma and Grandpa met. Or the story of Dad serving in the Gulf Wars. Or what life was like growing up in the 1950s. Or the story of working as a cab driver for 30 years. You get the idea! Any part of a person’s life that was important and should be saved for future generations to hear.

"A Date Which Will Live in Infamy"

Exactly 75 years ago, Japanese airplanes bombed Pearl Harbor and propelled the United States into World War II. It’s estimated that 64 million people died in World War II, and by the end of the war, not only was the United States changed but the world as well. By 1945, the number of U.S. military personnel was counted at 12,209,238, which means many of today’s genealogists have at least one ancestor who participated. Whether you are looking for historical or genealogical resources, the Midwest Genealogy Center and the Mid-Continent Public Library have you covered.

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